September

Blog Posts in September, 2010

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  • Defining the relationship between mild traumatic brain injury and postconcussion syndrome

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 24-Sep-2010

    It can be difficult to define mild traumatic brain injury ( mTBI ). Features such as age, sex, education, psychological history, or medical history can lead to differences in symptom reporting. The pathology of mTBI is unclear and can be different depending on the bio mechanics that caused the injury (accelerations/deceleration, direct blow, rotation). There is further difficulty in that symptoms ...
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  • Leisure activities after traumatic brain injury, Traumatic Brain Injury Attorneys

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 24-Sep-2010

    Leisure activities-such as reading, sports, outdoor activities, or other hobbies-are an important part of our day-to-day lives. Leisure activities can also contribute greatly to a recovery after TBI. Not only do such activities add opportunities for social interaction and physical health, they can also enhance a sense of independence and personal accomplishment for returning to an activity that ...
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  • Physical activity is related to glucose intolerance in spinal cord injury patients

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 24-Sep-2010

    Poor glucose tolerance (a precursor for diabetes) is relatively common in people with spinal cord injury. Muscle, which is heavily involved in glucose disposal and transport, becomes atrophied after spinal cord injury -thus leaving less muscle tissue left to respond to glucose. Additionally, the reduced level of physical activity common after spinal cord injury increases fasting glucose. A recent ...
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  • Surrogate consent and advocacy for research participation in cases of severe brain injury

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 24-Sep-2010

    Currently, there is no established standard of care for brain injury patients in a vegetative or minimally conscious state. New technology, such as deep brain stimulation, may hold promise as a treatment, but research efforts for these technologies can be complicated and stunted by ethical considerations. Monique Lanoix, an expert in medical ethics, has suggested two potential issues that ...
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  • Patterns in anoxic brain injury

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 17-Sep-2010

    Anoxic brain injury can result from anything that causes an inadequate supply of oxygen to the brain-carbon monoxide poisoning, respiratory arrest, or anemia, for instance. Certain parts of the brain are vulnerable to this decrease in oxygen, and these parts of the brain are responsible for functions such as memory, motor skills, and visual perception. Anoxic brain injuries do not occur as ...
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  • When "having your bell rung" really means "mild TBI": Terminology matters in sport-related brain injury

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 17-Sep-2010

    Concussion, mild traumatic brain injury, and mild head injury are diagnostic terms that have traditionally been interchangeable. Clinicians argue that each diagnosis carries a distinct set of features (especially between mTBI and concussion), but in the meantime, the exact terminology describing impact to the head can lead to stereotyping and inaccurate expectation of symptoms and recovery. In a ...
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  • Why does spinal cord regeneration therapy that works for animals fail to work for humans?

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 17-Sep-2010

    Spinal cord injury patients and their families may have heard of research success in regenerating neural damage. However, most of this success has come from animal studies, and have not translated well in human studies. A recent review of therapies for spinal cord injury discussed the reasons for this difference: In humans, the spinal cord injury extends over several sections of the spine. In ...
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  • DHA supplements reduce diffuse axonal injury

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 10-Sep-2010

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an omega-3 fatty acid that is commonly found in fish oil. Although the human body does not manufacture very much DHA naturally, a large percentage of our DHA is found in the white matter areas of our brains. Diffuse axonal injury-which is a common injury in falls or car accidents-can twist, stretch, and shear the white matter tracts of the brain. DHA has therefore ...
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  • Psychological distress and healthcare costs of pediatric mTBI

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 10-Sep-2010

    Although pediatric mTBI patients are not usually hospitalized, it is still expected that there will be some increase in TBI-related medical costs. Mild traumatic brain injuries are complex and outcomes can vary greatly-making a prediction of financial burden difficult to pinpoint. Past studies that have explored the financial burden of mTBI have been limited by variations in recovery time and ...
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  • Velcade is an effective treatment for TBI

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 10-Sep-2010

    Velcade (bortezomib) is a proteasome inhibitor that has been approved for use in certain cancers, and has been shown useful for other cardiovascular and inflammatory diseases. One of the most dangerous results of traumatic brain injury is the inflammation that can occur directly after injury. As a proteasome inhibitor, Velcade has the potential to regulate such inflammatory responses, and may ...
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  • The specific brain areas related to memory impairment in mTBI

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 3-Sep-2010

    Two main areas of the brain associated with memory are the medial temporal lobe, which houses the hippocampus and is thought to be responsible for consolidating new information into long-term memory, and the pre-frontal cortex, which has been found to be related to attention and short-term memory. In mild traumatic brain injury, one of the most common complaints is memory impairment. A recent ...
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  • Degeneration of Peripheral Motor Axons After Spinal Cord Injury

    Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 1-Sep-2010

    Peripheral motor axons are the long neural tracts that connect the spinal cord to muscle. When the spinal cord is traumatized, these tracts can degenerate from lack of input and activation, leading them to become weak and inactive. Using compound muscle action potentials, a tool that (in simple terms) measures the ability of the motor axon to activate when stimulated, a research team found ...
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