High School Footballers Wearing Special Helmets to Monitor Brain Injuries

High School Footballers Wearing Special Helmets to Monitor Brain Injuries

Posted By Scarlett Law Group || 19-Dec-2007

As they root for the home team from the bleachers this fall, high school gridiron fans in the small Illinois town of Tolono won’t necessarily see anything out of the ordinary down on the field. But just out of sight, tucked inside many of the maroon helmets worn by the Unity High School Rockets, a revolution of sorts is taking place. This season, 32 varsity team members are sporting helmets outfitted with the same electronic encoder modules now used by a handful of college teams.The purpose of the hightech headgear, which uses six strategically placed, spring-loaded accelerometers to wirelessly beam information to a Webbased system on a laptop
computer on the sidelines, is to more effectively – and more immediately – detect when blows to players’ heads may result in concussions or more severe brain injuries.

In addition, impact data – including location of hits, magnitude of force and duration of hits – is recorded for analysis by University of Illinois research team led by kinesiology and community health professor Steven Broglio.

“Unity is the only high school in the country using the Head Impact Telemetry System, or HITS,” Broglio said.

“There are 12 million high school football players across the nation,” he said. “This is a huge population we don’t know much about.”

Broglio said a number of other researchers at universities across the nation also are using the system as the basis for studies of biomechanical processes caused by concussions and traumatic brain injuries.

At Unity, each varsity player was given a baseline assessment for neurocognitive function prior to the start of the season.

“The baseline assessments are all over the map,” Broglio said. “Because the kids’ brains are still developing, they have different ranges and abilities.”

On the field during practice or on game day, when the encoder in an athlete’s helmet registers a hit, the system beams impact information to the sidelines laptop, which is monitored by the team’s athletic trainer.

“If an athlete is diagnosed with a concussion, he will not return to play until neurocognitive function returns to baseline performance,” Broglio said.

The fact that high school athletes’ brains may not yet be as fully developed as their college or professional counterparts is a large part of Broglio’s motivation for studying the system’s effectiveness on the younger players.

The U. of I. researcher noted that in many high schools across the country it’s not unusual for players to take a forceful hit, sit out briefly, then return to play. Sometimes they’ll even mask symptoms from coaches and trainers because they don’t want to miss the action.

Unfortunately, Broglio said, “what other researchers are finding is that people with multiple concussions have incurred Alzheimer’s Disease at a higher rate. There seems to be a link.”

The main focus of Broglio’s continuing research is to determine how the younger players actually function on the field, and gather data that “will ultimately protect and treat athletes who suffer concussive head injuries.”

“We will look at where and how hard they get hit,” he said, adding that one possible outcome of the work may be determining the need to develop a different type of helmet for high school athletes.

“We may find they’re getting hit in different places and need more padding in those areas of the helmet, for example.”

“The system picked up one athlete who was hitting with the top of his head, a practice that could result in spinal-cord injury,” Broglio said. Because they were able to identify the pattern, the
team’s coaches were able to work with the athlete to correct the habit.

“As we’ve gone through this first few weeks using the system, for the most part it’s been very good,” said Scott Hamilton, the Rockets’ head coach.

Source: www.calbia.org

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